Simple Saturday: Math fact memorization game

Got the goods? A few index cards, scissors, a pencil, and your brilliant brain? That's all we need to get going.

What math facts are you studying at school? Is your teacher constantly 'suggesting' that you practice with flash cards at home? How about we make a math a portable game that we can use just about anywhere? How does that sound?

All you do is draw a curve on the index card. (I used the edge of a cd for a guide.) 




Cut 9 notches on the edge of the curve. Write a numeral and a function in the center of the notched card. (I wrote X 6. I'll be multiplying the other numbers by 6.) Label each notch with a random, non-sequential number.  


 Flip the card over. (There will be much flipping over when making these, hence the reinforcement of math facts.) On the back side of a notch write the correct answer to the corresponding math fact. For instance, on the back of the card near the notch labeled as '4' I wrote the number '24' because 6 X 4 = 24.


Now let's play. Have someone hold up the card with the front of it facing you. Place a pencil in the notch. On our card, the pencil is placed on the '8'. So... 6 X 8 equals what? 48! Are you sure? Turn the card over to see if you got the answer correct. Yay, you!


Remember I told you that this math fact game was so easy a three-legged dog could do it? Let's quiz Tripod to see if my statement is true.

Tripod, what is the answer to the equation 5 - 2?           "3!"

Good, Tripod! How about 2 + 1?          "3!"

Great! Try this... 3 X 1?          "3!"

Oh yes, you're doing so well. Here comes a toughie. Can you reduce 18/6?          "3!"

Good dog, Tripod. Good dog.


Parents, it has been my experience that in the simple act of making these game cards the child experiences a great deal of math fact review. They must check and re-check the correctness of the equations in order to make this work. Once the cards are correct, you might like to allow them to decorate their fine work with small stickers or cool gel markers. Correct math facts first. Cool stuff after. (I'm so mean, aren't I?)